New 5Rivers Intern

 My name is Nicholas Motola and I will be the new intern for the 5Rivers program. I will be helping Andrew out by running the 5Rivers social media pages and the blog. Through this internship, I hope to make new connections with many schools and experts in the fishing industry who share the same passion. It seems that through fishing you meet great people who care about the environment and try to make the world a better place. I look forward to working with many clubs and adding some new clubs to the 5Rivers map!     A little bit about me,  I am a senior at SUNY Oswego studying Business Administration and a technology minor. On campus, I am the President/Costa Ambassador for the Oswego Fishing Club. In my free time I like to hunt, camp, snowmobile, play the bass guitar and of course fly fish. Montgomery, New York is home for me which is located at the foothills of the popular Catskill fly fishing region. Popular streams in this area include the East and West Branch of the Delaware River, the Beaverkill River, and the Willowemoc Creek. I found my passion for fishing around the age of 10 catching brown trout and the occasional brookie on these Catskill streams. As fishing played a major role in my life one of the reasons I chose SUNY Oswego is because of the great fishing opportunities in the surrounding area. Being an Eagle Scout, I learned to appreciate nature and that we must give back to the environment to provide for future generations to come.      A little bit about my club,  The Oswego Fishing Club was founded in 2013 by Josh Collette and joined the 5Rivers program in the fall of 2016. We have about 20 active members, who contribute greatly to the club’s success. Primarily we fish Lake Ontario tributaries such as the Salmon River and the Oswego River for Salmon, Steelhead, and Brown Trout. As most of the fish we catch are migratory from Lake Ontario, the average trout size is between 18”-32” and the average salmon weight is 20+ lbs making for an unforgettable fight keeping anglers coming back for more! During the winter months we mostly steelhead fish, but the club also does some ice fishing in the Thousand Islands region in New York. As a club we try to do at least 1 out of state trip every semester and fish as much as we can before/after class while also having a trip on the weekend. We are a campus recognized club that participates in many community events such as an annual Thanksgiving dinner for students and residents of the town of Oswego. By giving back to the community as much as possible, we feel like our contributions will help get young anglers started on the footpath for success!  Below is a link to the Oswego Fishing Club Instagram if you would like to learn more about the club.                             https://www.instagram.com/suny_oswego_fishing_club/?hl=en      Feel free to reach out to me anytime and to send in content to be featured on the 5Rivers Instagram and Facebook!                                           - Nick                                                   nmotola@oswego.edu                                                   (845)-800-9757

My name is Nicholas Motola and I will be the new intern for the 5Rivers program. I will be helping Andrew out by running the 5Rivers social media pages and the blog. Through this internship, I hope to make new connections with many schools and experts in the fishing industry who share the same passion. It seems that through fishing you meet great people who care about the environment and try to make the world a better place. I look forward to working with many clubs and adding some new clubs to the 5Rivers map!

 

A little bit about me,

I am a senior at SUNY Oswego studying Business Administration and a technology minor. On campus, I am the President/Costa Ambassador for the Oswego Fishing Club. In my free time I like to hunt, camp, snowmobile, play the bass guitar and of course fly fish. Montgomery, New York is home for me which is located at the foothills of the popular Catskill fly fishing region. Popular streams in this area include the East and West Branch of the Delaware River, the Beaverkill River, and the Willowemoc Creek. I found my passion for fishing around the age of 10 catching brown trout and the occasional brookie on these Catskill streams. As fishing played a major role in my life one of the reasons I chose SUNY Oswego is because of the great fishing opportunities in the surrounding area. Being an Eagle Scout, I learned to appreciate nature and that we must give back to the environment to provide for future generations to come. 

 

A little bit about my club,

The Oswego Fishing Club was founded in 2013 by Josh Collette and joined the 5Rivers program in the fall of 2016. We have about 20 active members, who contribute greatly to the club’s success. Primarily we fish Lake Ontario tributaries such as the Salmon River and the Oswego River for Salmon, Steelhead, and Brown Trout. As most of the fish we catch are migratory from Lake Ontario, the average trout size is between 18”-32” and the average salmon weight is 20+ lbs making for an unforgettable fight keeping anglers coming back for more! During the winter months we mostly steelhead fish, but the club also does some ice fishing in the Thousand Islands region in New York. As a club we try to do at least 1 out of state trip every semester and fish as much as we can before/after class while also having a trip on the weekend. We are a campus recognized club that participates in many community events such as an annual Thanksgiving dinner for students and residents of the town of Oswego. By giving back to the community as much as possible, we feel like our contributions will help get young anglers started on the footpath for success!  Below is a link to the Oswego Fishing Club Instagram if you would like to learn more about the club.

                          https://www.instagram.com/suny_oswego_fishing_club/?hl=en

 

Feel free to reach out to me anytime and to send in content to be featured on the 5Rivers Instagram and Facebook!

                                         - Nick

                                                nmotola@oswego.edu

                                                (845)-800-9757

A Native Odyssey Blog Post 10: Idaho

Public Land:

 Mmmm Trout Snack

Mmmm Trout Snack

 

Sawtooth National Forest

     The Sawtooth National Forest encompasses 2,110,408 acres largely in Idaho, but also partially in Utah. It is comprised of multiple terrain types including sagebrush steppe, spruce-fir forests, and alpine tundra. Throughout these terrains there are 3,500 miles of rivers and streams. The area is currently managed by the U.S. Forest Service as well as the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The forest offers visitors multiple recreation options. Over 1,000 miles of hiking trails are available, along with four ski areas, fishing opportunities, and whitewater boating. 81 campgrounds dot the area so it is not hard to find a place to pop up a tent.

-       Matt Crockett

Native Trout:

 Austin Holds a Westslope Cutthroat Trout

Austin Holds a Westslope Cutthroat Trout

Westslope cutthroat trout

     These trout were first discovered in 1805, when the Lewis and Clarke expedition took note of their existence. Westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) used to herald the most habitat of all species of cutthroat trout found in the American west, but today they occupy only half of their historical range. Traditional human land uses as well as invasive species have contributed to the decline of the species. However, genetically pure WCT inhabit a few major watersheds where they still persevere. These include the Flathead River in Montana, as well as portions of the Salmon and Priest Rivers in Idaho. These trout have forever been a symbol of the American west, and hopefully we are able to keep it that way.

Bull Trout

 A juvenile Bull Trout

A juvenile Bull Trout

     Bull trout, which are actually a species of char, are distributed in the Northern Rockies of the United States. These fish require cold, clean, and clear water to thrive, and can be found in many headwater streams, lakes, and larger river systems such as the Boise River in Idaho. Bull trout are inherently a migratory species, and because of this, culverts, dams, and roads can inhibit their migratory and spawning abilities. Bull trout face many threats from introduced species such as Lake trout and Northern pike, as well as several climate change related impacts. The population of Bull trout in the United States has changed little since 1998, but 60 percent of their current habitat is at risk.

-       Jacob Lacy

Our Experience:

A look at Bull trout. 

     We have now arrived in Idaho in search of the species we have all been waiting for – the big bad Bull trout. Every person we have crossed paths with across our trip that has experienced this trophy species told us tales that we could only dream of. All accounts pointed out that they were big, their appetites were bigger, and they were always eager to eat a fly.

     Our initial Bull trout encounter was unplanned and very exciting. We were fishing the Blackfoot river in Montana in search of Westslope cutthroat trout. We hiked (I scooted) down a huge slope to the Blackfoot river. We came across this crystal blue pool and managed to catch quite a few Westslope cutties. Beautiful 8-12 in. fish, but nothing close to what we saw next. There were 2 foot-plus Bull trout swimming through this pool and our jaws dropped. Their yellow bellies gleamed through the water. Due to high levels of Bull trout protection on the Blackfoot, we could only watch these monsters from the bank.

     The majority of Bull trout water is protected. They are fragmented across the country in an assortment of areas but the ability to plop a fly in front of their nose is highly illegal in most areas. The Yankee Fork provided us with the opportunity to knock Bull trout off our bucket list. We fished a smaller stretch of water, overgrown with vegetation. The entire team managed to catch a few Bull trout on small dry flies.  

     Bull trout were different than any species of trout I have come across yet. They had a slender body, almost like a mullet and were very easy to distinguish from other trout. Mission accomplished. Smaller than predicted, but still exciting nevertheless. 

-     Heather Harkavy